BKMT READING GUIDES

No.
24


 
Insightful,
Inspiring,
Life Changing

9 reviews

The Hate U Give
by Angie Thomas

Published: 2017-02-28
Hardcover : 464 pages
151 members reading this now
279 clubs reading this now
16 members have read this book
Recommended to book clubs by 9 of 9 members

8 starred reviews ? Goodreads Choice Awards Best of the Best William C. Morris Award Winner ? National Book Award Longlist ? Printz Honor Book ? Coretta Scott King Honor Book ? #1 New York Times Bestseller!

"Absolutely riveting!" —Jason Reynolds

"Stunning." —John Green

"This story ...

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Introduction

8 starred reviews ? Goodreads Choice Awards Best of the Best William C. Morris Award Winner ? National Book Award Longlist ? Printz Honor Book ? Coretta Scott King Honor Book ? #1 New York Times Bestseller!

"Absolutely riveting!" —Jason Reynolds

"Stunning." —John Green

"This story is necessary. This story is important." —Kirkus (starred review)

"Heartbreakingly topical." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"A marvel of verisimilitude." —Booklist (starred review)

"A powerful, in-your-face novel." —Horn Book (starred review)

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

And don't miss On the Come Up, Angie Thomas's powerful follow-up to The Hate U Give.

Editorial Review

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Excerpt

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Discussion Questions

1. As Starr and Khalil listen to Tupac, Khalil explains what Tupac said “Thug Life” meant. Discuss the meaning of the term “Thug Life” as an acronym and why the author might have chosen part of this as the title of the book. In what ways do you see this in society today? (Chapter 1).

2. Chapter 2 begins with Starr flashing back to two talks her parents had with her when she was young. One was about sex (“the usual birds and bees”). The second was about what precautions to take when encountering a police officer (Chapter 2). Have you had a similar conversation about what to do when stopped by the police? Reflect upon or imagine this conversation.

3. Thomas frequently uses motifs of silence and voice throughout the book. Find instances in the book where silence or voice and speech are noted, and talk about the author’s possible intentions for emphasizing these motifs.

4. At the police station after Starr details the events leading up to the shooting, the detective shifts her focus to Khalil’s past. Why do you think the detective did this? Discuss Starr’s reaction to this “bait” (Chapter 6). Discuss the way that Khalil is portrayed by the media. How does Starr work to counteract this media portrayal?

5. How do you think Starr would define family? What about Seven, DeVante, Kenya and Khalil? Do you have to be related by blood to consider a person family? How do you define family?

6. Once news of Khalil’s shooting spreads across the neighborhood, unrest arises: “Sirens wail outside. The news shows three patrol cars that have been set ablaze at the police precinct…A gas station near the freeway gets looted…My neighborhood is a war zone” (Chapter 9). Respond to this development and describe some parallels to current events.

7. Chris and Starr have a breakthrough in their relationship --- Starr admits to him that she was in the car with Khalil and shares the memories of Natasha’s murder (Chapter 17). Discuss why Starr’s admission and releasing of this burden to Chris is significant. Explore the practice of “code switching” and discuss how you might code switch in different circumstances in your own life.

8. How and why does the neighborhood react to the grand jury’s decision (Chapter 23)? How does Starr use her voice as a weapon, and why does she feel that it is vital that she does? Refer back to “Thug Life” and discuss how the acronym resonates in this chapter.

9. Maverick’s rose garden is a recurring symbol throughout the course of the novel. Discuss the symbolism of the rose garden and how it contributes to the overall theme.

10. Starr pledges to “never be quiet” (Chapter 26). After reading this book, how can you use your voice to promote and advance social justice? Reflect on how you and your community discuss and address inequality.

Suggested by Members

Did you find this believable and if not, which part did you find hard to believe?
by crabbyburton (see profile) 02/28/18

Which character do you feel was most transformed in this story?
Have you ever felt profiled? If so, when? How did this affect how you acted?
Starr shares that she is two people- the Starr at school and the one in her neighborhood. Have you ever felt that you had two personas? Why?
by BetsyO58 (see profile) 06/09/17

Notes From the Author to the Bookclub

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