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Slow,
Boring,
Pointless

5 reviews

Radio Girls
by Sarah-Jane Stratford

Published: 2016-06-14
Paperback : 384 pages
6 members reading this now
14 clubs reading this now
4 members have read this book
Recommended to book clubs by 3 of 5 members
The Great War is over, and change is in the air, in this novel that brings to life the exciting days of early British radio…and one woman who finds her voice while working alongside the brilliant women and men of the BBC.
 
London, 1926. American-raised Maisie Musgrave is thrilled to ...
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Introduction

The Great War is over, and change is in the air, in this novel that brings to life the exciting days of early British radio…and one woman who finds her voice while working alongside the brilliant women and men of the BBC.
 
London, 1926. American-raised Maisie Musgrave is thrilled to land a job as a secretary at the upstart British Broadcasting Corporation, whose use of radio—still new, strange, and electrifying—is captivating the nation. But the hectic pace, smart young staff, and intimidating bosses only add to Maisie’s insecurity.
 
Soon, she is seduced by the work—gaining confidence as she arranges broadcasts by the most famous writers, scientists, and politicians in Britain. She is also caught up in a growing conflict between her two bosses, John Reith, the formidable Director-General of the BBC, and Hilda Matheson, the extraordinary director of the hugely popular Talks programming, who each have very different visions of what radio should be. Under Hilda’s tutelage, Maisie discovers her talent, passion, and ambition. But when she unearths a shocking conspiracy, she and Hilda join forces to make their voices heard both on and off the air…and then face the dangerous consequences of telling the truth for a living.
 
 
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Editorial Review

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Excerpt

The door was ajar. Maisie peered in and saw a severely tidy desk. There seemed to be a building block in the in-tray, but as Maisie drew closer, she realized it was only correspondence stacked so meticulously as to appear smooth. A half-written letter in a rather scrawly hand lay on the blotter. A pile of books. A green leather diary. Maisie chewed her lip as she studied the desk, wondering where to lay her burden. ... view entire excerpt...

Discussion Questions

1. Hilda sees radio as an opportunity to educate the public and is especially keen on having more books and poetry discussed on the radio, as well as presenting sociopolitical debates. Does media still serve an educational purpose today? How might media broaden understanding throughout society?

2. Maisie is initially mistrustful of both Hilda and Phyllida— Hilda because she is, as Maisie sees it, a woman in a man’s job; Phyllida because she appears to look down on Maisie. Both these women become her closest friends and allies. How do you think they help her become a stronger, more confident person? Discuss how Maisie’s personality—the wit she’s kept under wraps most of her life—blossoms as a result of her friendships.

3. Many people in 1920s Britain are worried about the effect of technology and media. Mrs. Crewe, Maisie’s landlady, is fearful of the idea of disembodied voices in the house. Are there any parallels to how technology is viewed in society today? How was the radio in its early days similar to the Internet today? How are the privacy concerns similar and different?

Suggested by Members

If you were a "Talks" producer, whom would you like to have on your program?
by DebbieSzy (see profile) 02/07/17

Notes From the Author to the Bookclub

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Book Club Recommendations

Member Reviews

Overall rating:
 
 
  "Early Days of Radio"by DebbieSzy (see profile) 02/07/17

I loved this book. Sarah-Jane Stratford's historical novel is a fascinating look into the early days of the BBC during the 1920's, along with the history of women in the workplace and women'... (read more)

 
by BookDivasReads (see profile) 03/17/18

 
by mhpainter (see profile) 08/09/17

 
  "The Radio Girls"by bookchicks (see profile) 02/24/17

IT was very slow and didn't impress me at all. The last two chapters were the only good in the book. Could have been a very good book if written more actively.

 
  "Radio Girls"by Carolynr (see profile) 07/26/16

London, 1926. American-raised Maisie Musgrave is thrilled to land a job as a secretary at the upstart British Broadcasting Corporation, whose use of radio—still new, strange, and electrify... (read more)

 
  "Radio Girls"by Silversolara (see profile) 06/30/16

Before the Internet and cell phones.

Before women were seen as being more than secretar?ies?.

RADIO GIRLS takes us back to the ?era of the ?wireless ?radio ?and the BBC.? Loved the hi



... (read more)

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