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Insightful,
Beautiful,
Interesting

12 reviews

The Joy Luck Club
by Amy Tan

Published: 2006-09-21
Kindle Edition : 354 pages
25 members reading this now
48 clubs reading this now
33 members have read this book
Recommended to book clubs by 10 of 12 members
This widely acclaimed bestseller spans two countries and two generations, following a group of Chinese women who meet to play mah jong, invest money and tell the secret stories of their lives. They call their gathering the Joy Luck ...
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Introduction

First time in trade paperback. The New York Times Book Review says of this mesmerizing novel by Amy Tan: "So beutifully written that one should . . . allow oneself to be bourne along as if in a dream . . . a jewel of a book". "The Joy Luck Club is a pure joy to read".--Chicago Tribune.

Editorial Review

Four mothers, four daughters, four families whose histories shift with the four winds depending on who's "saying" the stories. In 1949 four Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco, begin meeting to eat dim sum, play mahjong, and talk. United in shared unspeakable loss and hope, they call themselves the Joy Luck Club. Rather than sink into tragedy, they choose to gather to raise their spirits and money. "To despair was to wish back for something already lost. Or to prolong what was already unbearable." Forty years later the stories and history continue.

With wit and sensitivity, Amy Tan examines the sometimes painful, often tender, and always deep connection between mothers and daughters. As each woman reveals her secrets, trying to unravel the truth about her life, the strings become more tangled, more entwined. Mothers boast or despair over daughters, and daughters roll their eyes even as they feel the inextricable tightening of their matriarchal ties. Tan is an astute storyteller, enticing readers to immerse themselves into these lives of complexity and mystery.

Excerpt

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Discussion Questions

Suggested by Members

What does the swan in the prologue represent?
To what extent did this book represent for you the feelings of frustration, hopelessness, failure to communicate, and even failure?
An-mei’s mother returns when Popo is sick and dying. She sacrifices a piece of her arm to make a soup. Is An-mei’s mother’s sacrifice only about making her mother physically well?
by Pam Jones (see profile) 12/11/10

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