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The Hypnotist (The Reincarnationist, Book 3)
by M. J. Rose

Published: 2011-04-19
Paperback : 416 pages
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Haunted by his inability to stop the murder of a beautiful young painter twenty years ago, Lucian Glass keeps his demons at bay through his fascinating work with the FBI's Art Crime Team. Investigating a crazed collector who's begun destroying prized masterworks, Glass is thrust into a ...
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Introduction

Haunted by his inability to stop the murder of a beautiful young painter twenty years ago, Lucian Glass keeps his demons at bay through his fascinating work with the FBI's Art Crime Team. Investigating a crazed collector who's begun destroying prized masterworks, Glass is thrust into a bizarre hostage negotiation that takes him undercover at the Phoenix Foundation--dedicated to the science of past-life study. There, to maintain his cover, he submits to the treatment of a hypnotist.

Under hypnosis, Glass travels from ancient Greece to nineteenth-century Persia, while the case takes him from New York to Paris and the movie while the case takes him from New York to Paris and the movie capital of the world. These journeys will change his very understanding of reality, lead him to question his own sanity and land him at the center of perhaps the most audacious art heist in history: a fifteen-hundred-year-old sculpture the nation of Iran will do anything to recover.

If you haven't been reading M.J. Rose's Reincarnationist series, then THE HYPNOTIST will blow away any excuse you may have had... A memorable, engrossing read, a story that sets a new bar for Rose. Something for everyone: murder, suspense, history, romance, the supernatural, mystery and erotica. These elements are woven together so skillfully that the whole becomes something new and different.... Rose, who never disappoints either her die-hard fans or the casual reader, has surpassed herself.
--Bookreporter.com


The Hypnotist is the very definition of thriller: threats modern and ancient, winding around one of the world's great museums, with a cast of compelling individuals who move through gloriously exotic settings. M. J. Rose tells a story built on the idea that saving love is indistinguishable from saving the world.
-- NYT Bestseller Laurie R. King

Rose's work defies comparison, The Hypnotist so cutting edge that the pages stop just short of slicing your fingers as you race to turn them. She draws us into a world totally of her own making, and the result is a slick, ambitious, and beautifully written tale.
---Providence Journal

Fascinating characters, an incredibly complex plot and a hint of the paranormal make this books simply unforgettable.

--RT Book Reviews--Top Pick 4 ½ stars


Editorial Review

No editorial review at this time.

Excerpt

"Were I called on to define, very briefly, the term Art, I should call it the reproduction of what the Senses perceive in Nature through the veil of the soul."
—Edgar Allan Poe
Twenty Years Ago
Time played tricks on him whenever he stood in front of the easel. Hypnotized by the rhythm of the brush on the canvas, by one color merging into another, the two shades creating a third, the third melting into a fourth, he was lulled into a state of single-minded consciousness focused only on the image emerging. Immersed in the act of painting, he forgot obligations, missed classes, didn't remember to eat or to drink or look at the clock. This was why, at 5:25 that Friday evening, Lucian Glass was rushing down the urine-stinking steps to the gloomy subway platform when he should have already been uptown where Solange Jacobs was waiting for him at her father's framing gallery. Together, they planned to walk over to an exhibit a block away, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. ... view entire excerpt...

Discussion Questions

From author M.J. Rose:


1.On the first page of this novel is a quote:

Often, in the cosseted quarters of a museum, we forget that every work of ancient art is a survivor, a representative of untold numbers of similar artworks that perished. This triumphant exhibition makes us remember, while demonstrating that every survivor saves much more than just itself: long strands of culture, identity and history waiting to be woven back together. – Roberta Smith writing in the New York Times about the exhibit: Silent Survivors of Afghanistan’s 4,000 Tumultuous Years


How do you think that quote relates to both the theme of this book and the subject of reincarnation?

2. Who do you think does own art? Should the cultural heritage of a piece of artwork determine what museum it finally winds up in? Should the Metropolitan museum have returned Hypnos to Greece? To Iran?

3. The main characters in the book – Lucian and Emeline are both faced with choices between art and personal life. What are some of these dilemmas, and how does each character resolve or at least experience them?

4. How does the myth of Hypnos, the Greek God of Sleep, figure into the story and how does the author use that myth to mirror the novel’s plot.

5. The author Laurie R. King says that the Rose has told a story built on the idea that saving love is indistinguishable from saving the world. How does that theme show itself and how does it resolve itself?

Notes From the Author to the Bookclub

Note from author M.J. Rose:

At the Museum by M.J. Rose

Growing up, I didn’t want to be a writer; I wanted to be an artist. We lived a block away from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and I started taking Saturday morning art classes there when I was just seven years old.

I’ve often felt art is my religion and that museums in general but the Met specifically is my temple of choice. It’s where I go to be renewed, refreshed and inspired. I don’t think I’ve ever gone longer than a month without visiting there.

So its not all that surprising that sooner or later I’d write a novel with a museum as one of my main characters and that I’d pick the museum that was in my backyard when I was a kid.

But how I got idea for the Hypnotist is surprising, at least to me.

One day about three and a half years ago, on one of my regular pilgrimages to the Met, I headed straight for one of my favorite spots. The Mastaba Tomb of Perneb is a tiny bit of 5th Dynasty Egypt transplanted to Manhattan. A gift from Edward S. Harkness to the museum in 1913.

You can enter the limestone tomb from the left or the right. One doorway leads to the main offering chapel. I took the other, which leads to a second ritual chamber. The space is very small and only three or four people can fit at the same time. I was lucky to be in the intimate ritual chamber alone and looking through the slot in the wall at a wooden statue of Perneb in the room beyond known as a serdab. In ancient times this passage way allowed for family and priests to offer up incense and chants to the deceased.

I heard footsteps. A little girl about seven or eight had entered and came up beside me to look through the slot. She had with long blonde hair and was wearing a school uniform. I watched her examine the space, giving every section careful attention.

“It hasn’t changed much at all,” she said finally in a wistful voice.

I asked her what she meant.

“Since the last time I was here,” she said.

Something about the way she said it made me curious. “When was that?” I asked.

“When I lived in Egypt.”

“You know this tomb has been on display in this museum since 1916.” I said.

“I lived in Egypt way before that,” she said and smiled. She was about to say something else when from outside the chamber an older woman’s voice called out.

“Veronica, it’s time to go. Now. Please.”

The little girl ran off, quickly, without looking back, without giving me a chance to ask her anything else.

Even though I write about reincarnation, I haven’t had any meaningful reincarnation episodes of my own. I don’t get visitations. I’ve never seen a ghost. But I not sure what happened that afternoon.

I can picture Veronica in her navy jumper and white blouse that had a dark smudge on the collar. She had a one-inch scratch on her left hand. Her hair was pulled off her face with a silver barrette. A lot of curls had escaped. She had a child’s voice but it was so charged with adult emotion.

It was that emotion which sparked the idea for my novel, The Hypnotist. And the paintings and sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum that fueled it. I have always been fascinated with who owns art. The artist? The buyer? The country it was created in? Or te one that is rich enough to own it? Why does art move us so much? Why do we treasure it?

If you go the Met, please go visit Perneb’s tomb. And if you see a little girl there with long blonde hair and a blue school uniform… ask her if her name is Veronica… and if it is, thank her for me.

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  "Hypnotist"by cacinn (see profile) 08/03/11

It didn't deliver

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