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Moonlight School
by Suzanne Woods Fisher

Published: 2021-02-02T00:0
Paperback : 320 pages
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Based on true events, a young woman used to the finer things in life arrives in small town Appalachia in 1911 to help her formidable cousin combat adult illiteracy by opening moonlight ...
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Introduction

Based on true events, a young woman used to the finer things in life arrives in small town Appalachia in 1911 to help her formidable cousin combat adult illiteracy by opening moonlight schools.

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Discussion Questions

1. Cora Wilson Stewart was an unsung hero, a woman ahead
of her time. The facts surrounding her life were all true—she
was raised in Rowan County, she became the first female
Superintendent of Education, she was divorced three times
(twice to the same man), she created the Moonlight School
campaign, and she had a remarkable, purposeful long life.
What aspects of her life or personality did you find most
inspiring?

2. How do you respond to Brother Wyatt’s provocative
question: “If it’s not wrong, does that make it right?”

3. Cora, who did not have success with marriage, held a
calling to a life’s work in higher regard than matrimony.
She gave Lucy a warning about men. “A man like Andrew
Spencer has the looks and charisma that can hide flaws.
Like soft spots on a seemingly perfect apple. You don’t realize
they’re there until you bite into them.” What is your
reaction to Cora’s advice?

4. Brother Wyatt divided Almighty into two words. All
Mighty. Mighty over all. He said it made a difference.
How so?

5. Sally Ann Duncan told Lucy, “Sometimes you have to give
something up to make room for something new.” How
many times did you notice that adage coming true in this
story?

6. “Try to picture,” Cora said, “what life is like for one who
must get all his information by ear. If a man cannot read
or write or vote, he cannot speak. He is mute. He is forgotten.
You might think it’s a pity they cannot read, but the
real tragedy is they cannot speak.” Put yourself in the place
of an illiterate. What privileges would you be missing?

7. Lucy’s father was unlikable and likable, both. He lived
by a basic philosophy: “Better to face forward in life,
not backward.” Given the circumstances of his life, from
growing up in Rowan County, to losing his wife and
daughter, what are your thoughts about his mantra? Was
it a coping mechanism? Or wise counsel?

8. Put yourself in Lucy’s polished boots. How would you
have handled her discovery of Angie’s identity? Do you
think Lucy made the right decision? Explain.

9. Finding a life of purpose is a central theme in this novel.
Lucy Wilson found purpose in Rowan County. Or . . . did
purpose find her?

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