BKMT READING GUIDES

No.
86


 
Dramatic,
Addictive,
Interesting

17 reviews

The Girl on the Train
by Paula Hawkins

Published: 2016-07-12
Paperback : 336 pages
7 members reading this now
824 clubs reading this now
38 members have read this book
Recommended to book clubs by 15 of 17 members
The #1 New York Times Bestseller, USA Today Book of the Year, now a major motion picture starring Emily Blunt. Don't miss Paula Hawkins' new novel, Into the Water, coming May 2017.
 
The debut psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at other people's lives.
 
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Introduction

The #1 New York Times Bestseller, USA Today Book of the Year, now a major motion picture starring Emily Blunt. Don't miss Paula Hawkins' new novel, Into the Water, coming May 2017.
 
The debut psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at other people's lives.
 
“Nothing is more addicting than The Girl on the Train.”—Vanity Fair

The Girl on the Train has more fun with unreliable narration than any chiller since Gone Girl. . . . [It] is liable to draw a large, bedazzled readership.”—The New York Times

 
“Marries movie noir with novelistic trickery. . . hang on tight. You'll be surprised by what horrors lurk around the bend.”—USA Today
 
“Like its train, the story blasts through the stagnation of these lives in suburban London and the reader cannot help but turn pages.”—The Boston Globe

Gone Girl fans will devour this psychological thriller.”—People 

 
 
EVERY DAY THE SAME
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

UNTIL TODAY
And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

Editorial Review

An Amazon Best Book of the Month, January 2015: Intersecting, overlapping, not-quite-what-they-seem lives. Jealousies and betrayals and wounded hearts. A haunting unease that clutches and won’t let go. All this and more helps propel Paula Hawkins’s addictive debut into a new stratum of the psychological thriller genre. At times, I couldn’t help but think: Hitchcockian. From the opening line, the reader knows what they’re in for: “She’s buried beneath a silver birch tree, down towards the old train tracks…” But Hawkins teases out the mystery with a veteran’s finesse. The “girl on the train” is Rachel, who commutes into London and back each day, rolling past the backyard of a happy-looking couple she names Jess and Jason. Then one day Rachel sees “Jess” kissing another man. The day after that, Jess goes missing. The story is told from three character’s not-to-be-trusted perspectives: Rachel, who mourns the loss of her former life with the help of canned gin and tonics; Megan (aka Jess); and Anna, Rachel’s ex-husband’s wife, who happens to be Jess/Megan’s neighbor. Rachel’s voyeuristic yearning for the seemingly idyllic life of Jess and Jason lures her closer and closer to the investigation into Jess/Megan’s disappearance, and closer to a deeper understanding of who she really is. And who she isn’t. This is a book to be devoured. -Neal Thompson

Excerpt

No Excerpt Currently Available

Discussion Questions

We all do it—actively watch life around us. In this way, with her own voyeuristic curiosity, Rachel Watson is not so unusual. What do you think accounts for this nosey, all-too-human impulse? Is it more extreme in Rachel than in the average person? What is so different about her?

How would you have reacted if you’d seen what Rachel did from her train window—a pile of clothes—just before the rumored disappearance of Megan Hipwell? What might you or she have done differently?

In both Rachel Watson’s and Megan Hipwell’s marriages, deep secrets are kept from the husbands. Are these marriages unusual or even extreme in this way? Consider how many relationships rely on half-truths? Is it ever necessary or justifiable to lie to someone you love? How much is too much to hide from a partner?

What about the lies the characters tell to themselves? In what ways is Rachel lying to herself? Do all people tell themselves lies to some degree in order to move on with their lives? Is what Rachel (or any of the other characters) is doing any different from that? How do her lies ultimately affect her and the people around her?

A crucial question in The Girl on the Train is how much Rachel Watson can trust her own memory. How reliable are her observations? Yet since the relationship between truth and memory is often a slippery one, how objective or “true” can a memory, by definition, really be? Can memory lie? If so, what factors might influence it? Consider examples from the book.

One of Rachel’s deepest disappointments, it turns out, is that she can’t have children. Her ex-husband Tom’s second wife Anna is the mother to a young child, Evie. How does Rachel’s inability to conceive precipitate her breakdown? How does the topic of motherhood drive the plot of the story? What do you think Paula Hawkins was trying to say about the ways motherhood can define women’s lives or what we expect from women’s domestic lives, whether as wives, mothers, or unmarried women in general?

Think about trust in The Girl on the Train. Who trusts whom? Who is deserving of trust? Is Rachel Watson a very trustworthy person? Why or why not? Who appears trustworthy and is actually not? What are the skills we use to make the decision about whether to trust someone we don’t know well?

Other characters in the novel make different assumptions about Rachel Watson depending on how or even where they see her. To a certain extent, she understands this and often tries to manipulate their assumptions—by appearing to be a commuter, for instance, going to work every day. Is she successful? To what degree did you make assumptions about Rachel early on based on the facts and appearances you were presented? How did those change over time and why? How did your assumptions about her affect your reading of the central mystery in the book? Did your assumptions about her change over its course? What other characters did you make assumptions about? How did your assumptions affect your interpretation of the plot? Having now finished The Girl on the Train, what surprised you the most?


Suggested by Members

Alcoholism
by madriver (see profile) 11/02/16

Who would you have liked to see die by the end of the novel?
Did you think Kamal was a bad guy?
How does the train should the story's progression?
by jmarrier27 (see profile) 10/08/16

Did you have a favorite character?
by Burgo49 (see profile) 08/26/16

We still discuss this book.
by LadyPersia (see profile) 06/28/16

What do you think happened to the therapist (Kamal Abdic) in the years following the murder?
by oliviasavage (see profile) 03/01/16

What role does childbearing play in the lives of the major female characters?
by bspourch (see profile) 02/28/16

Motherhood - being a mother - what kind of a mother - wanting to be a mother - How to be a mother
Do you ever really know somenone? Who do you trust? Things aren't always as they seem. Are you keeping secrets that are destroyng your life?
Can people change? Is therapy a useful tool, a necessary tool?
by ThePageTurners (see profile) 09/22/15

Which characters, if any, did you like in this book?
by Mshan (see profile) 08/04/15

How did your opinion of Rachel change over the course of the novel? How did her abuse of alcohol contribute to her problems and the truth concerning what she observed?
by CynKing57 (see profile) 07/25/15

Is it ever necessary or justifiable to lie to someone you love? How much is too much to hide from a partner?
Have you ever told yourself lies to some degree in order to move on with your life?
Since the relationship between truth and memory is often a slippery one, how objective or “true” can a memory, by definition, really be?
by MarlaTapper (see profile) 06/27/15

Notes From the Author to the Bookclub

No notes at this time.

Book Club Recommendations

Member Reviews

Overall rating:
 
 
by silhanek@comcast.net (see profile) 08/16/17

 
by EGarrandes (see profile) 08/13/17

 
by gretta1901@gmail.com (see profile) 08/06/17

 
by chaputs01225@me.com (see profile) 07/21/17

 
by chan.caneda@gmail.com (see profile) 07/11/17

The book itself was well written. The main character Rachel is a drunk who catches the same train every day and then one day sees something unusual.
I found the story somewhat predictable a
... (read more)

 
by loladep (see profile) 07/08/17

 
by hoy.samantha1@gmail.com (see profile) 07/07/17

 
by Thalls (see profile) 06/26/17

 
  "Girl on the Train"by sunny7wilt (see profile) 05/06/17

I was disappointed in the book, especially after it was on the bestseller list for so long and then made into a movie. I thought the plot was contrived. I did not find the protagonist to be especially... (read more)

 
by l.rayner27@yahoo.com (see profile) 05/02/17

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